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POOR POSTURE: LOWER BACK

Why is Posture Important?
Sway Back
Short Leg Syndrome
Piriformis Syndrome
Disc Herniations
Impaired Breathing
Running Injuries



Why is Posture Important?
For most of us, poor posture becomes our normal way of being. As we sink deeper into the couch or hunch our shoulders over a computer, we start to think we actually maybe shrinking. Guess what? All of a sudden posture is a big deal. See our book "Perfect Posture." Click the image to the right to enlarge.
Why is Posture Important
Sway Back
Tight hamstrings and hip flexors tilt your pelvis forward and jam the joints in the lower back together causing arthritis and the most common type of low back pain; lumbar facet syndrome.
Sway Back
Short Leg Syndrome
Caused by a tight flank muscle which “hikes” the hip up and tilts the pelvis sideways. These alterations in posture create sheer stress on the low back and are exaggerated by sitting, walking, running and cycling.
Short Leg Syndrome
Piriformis Syndrome
A combination of sway back and hip hiking. The piriformis, a muscle deep in the buttocks, shortens and pulls your pelvis out of alignment and pinches the sciatic nerve. Commonly misdiagnosed as sciatica.
Piriformis Syndrome
Disc Herniations
Poor posture places incredible strain on our spines. Over time our, soft shock absorbing, discs become brittle and vulnerable to injury. All it takes is one small unguarded movement such as bending down to tie your shoe or coughing or sneezing and Wham! Your disc may herniated.
Disc Herniations
Impaired Breathing
The breath and posture are interchangeable. Short, shallow breathing, associated with emotional stress and tension, tightens the very muscles needed to help expand your rib cage. This creates a posture which does not allow full deep breaths.
Impaired Breathing
Running Injuries
IT Band syndrome, patella tracking problems and bursitis generally effect runners because of weak “Gluteus Medius” muscles. This muscle’s primary purpose is to keep your hips level when running. When weak, your hip drops and places excessive strain on the outer thigh consequently pulling your knee cap out of alignment thus creating friction with every single stride.
Running Injuries

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